Surprise! We worked as pickers again.

No, not for Amazon, like we did in 2017.

Better.

Way, way better.

This time we were picking lint out of Carlsbad Caverns.

Yes, actual lint.

Like dryer vent lint, but 800 feet under ground, embedded in what you might think of as Mother Nature’s navel, for four days, with 30 other RVing volunteers who paid for a week-long excursion to get the job done.

It went like this.
And sometimes like this.

Like picking merchandise for Amazon, our task was tedious and repetitive, and it left us with surprisingly sore muscles, but this time? We earned far more reward. Our team was helping — really helping — one of our treasured national parks look better, and maybe even survive longer.

Are you still stuck on the lint thing? Fine.

How does the lint get there?

About half a million visitors walk through the caverns each year (that, and other cool facts about the park are here). The clothing fibers, hair, and skin cells that naturally fall off of their bodies end up collecting as wads of lint along the walkways, and also trapped on the sides and in crevices of nearby rock formations.

The lint makes the formations look grubby, and also causes them to break down over time, as it collects moisture and blocks air from their surfaces.

This problem was discovered about 30 years ago, and volunteers have been arduously and carefully removing lint ever since, at a rate of about 19 pounds a year. (Remember that number. There’s a quiz later.)

This poster in the Visitor Center explains it.
(Photo: D. Goldstein)
We looked just like the poster!
(Photo: D. Goldstein)
Sort of?

Fascinating. Now how did you get there?

We signed up to join the Escapees Carlsbad Caverns Cleanup Hangout as soon as registration opened back in October, knowing that 1) this Hangout’s mission was to spend a week in service to a national park, and 2) that we are already big fans of this particular program after having such a blast at the Downeast Maine Hangout last year.

Our Hangout directors made sure we always knew where to be, when to be there, and what to do, and they also coordinated some group events and meals outside of work time, so that we could all have fun getting to know each other.

Our welcome gathering on the first night, with directors David & Cheryl Goldstein (standing) describing the mission we were about to accept.
We went on a group hike to nearby Guadalupe Mountains National Park, and…
… ate out at few locally owned restaurants.
And of course, as RVers do wherever they gather, we overindulged at more than a couple of potlucks at the campground.
(Photo: C. Goldstein)
We all stayed at White’s City RV Park, a quick 7-mile drive from the caverns.
No frills, but quiet and convenient, with access to a 3.6 mile hiking trail to the park, for those who might want a more strenuous way to get back and forth.
I climbed only the first 1/4 mile to get this photo of the campground from above.

Did you need special equipment?

Yes, and the park can provide all of it, but our group arrived prepared with a lot of our own gear. Our yellow vests with the Escapees logo were included in our event fee; the park has a stash of their own logo vests for other volunteers to borrow.

For safety: reflective vests, knee pads, head lamps, helmets, rubber gloves

For lint collecting: paint brushes in various sizes, plastic baggies

Who you gonna call? Lint Busters!
(Someday, I will forgive Hangout Director David Goldstein for implanting that ear worm. But not yet.)
Orientation, training, and gear issue took up most of our first morning.
After a lunch break, we were ready to get to work!

What were your work hours and conditions?

Expectations were clear from the start. We weren’t scared.

This screen cap is from our Hangout description page.
Click here for a more thorough document.

Our work hours in the cavern were from 10-12 and 1-3, Monday through Thursday, with lunch on site (brown bag or park concession).

At 9:30 a.m., we’d gather in our meeting room with our ranger (Jo Ann Garcia or David Tise, depending on the day), learn about our work location while gathering our equipment and putting on our gear, and then descend together to the cleaning area. At noon, we’d stop work, head back up to the meeting room to drop off our equipment and gear, and take our lunch break. Repeat the 9:30 routine at 1:00, and the noon routine at 3:00, only we’d go home instead of to lunch.

On Day 1, we descended through the natural entrance into the Bat Cave, and in just over 2 hours…
… this was what only half of our collection looked like. I took this picture before everyone had returned to our meeting room with their haul.
Daily amounts varied by individual, and by the areas in which we were picking. My bags weighed right around 2.5 ounces — after four hours of very diligent work.
Annotated map showing where we worked each day
(Credit: D. Goldstein)
Here’s our crew of triumphant lint pickers, with all the gunk we collected in that black garbage bag in front of us.
No, we’re not flashing gang signs. The Hawaiian shaka, meaning “hang loose,” is the official Hangouts symbol, greeting, and goofy pose of choice.
(Photo: random guy with a real camera and a lot of patience)

Did anything unexpected happen?

Well, one thing we were not prepared for was the number of cavern visitors who stopped to ask us what we were doing. We’d explain as briefly as we could, since we had work to do and they had exploring to do, and it was such a kick to watch their reactions.

They were astounded — and a bit grossed out — to learn that lint is such a big issue, and every person I spoke to expressed sincere gratitude for our efforts. I even got a few laughs when I’d joke in my best mom voice, “Don’t walk there. I just cleaned that!”

Get to the good part, Emily. How much lint did y’all get???

Remember the annual average I told you way up there?

I’ll save you the scroll.

It was 19 pounds.

Our crew of 32, putting in seven roughly 2-hour shifts over four days, right here at the beginning of 2020, collected …

… drum roll please …

28 pounds.

Twenty. Eight. Pounds.

Eeeeeeeeee!!!!!

Were you compensated for your efforts?

As volunteers, the only compensation we wanted or needed was the satisfaction of providing a much needed service, and we got plenty.

The park also thanked us with some nice material goodies, including certificates of appreciation, logo pencils, water bottles, and bandanas.

They also gifted us on our last day with a complimentary guided tour of the King’s Palace, a section of the cave that not many visitors get to see, as it requires an advance reservation and an additional fee.

Now that’s my kind of reward: a unique and memorable experience.

I’m not an RV’er or an Escapee. Can I pick lint too?

Yes. According to our rangers, the park welcomes scouts and other service groups, as well as individuals and families (ages 10 and up). Contact the volunteer coordinator to make arrangements, and you too can fill a baggie (or 2 or 6 or 30) with icky gray cave lint!


For further reading:

15 reasons we acted like kids at summer camp in Maine

Take my money!

Although I thrive on our usual “roll by the seats of our pants” style of unplanned travel, I also enjoy an occasional event or trip for which all we have to do is pay a fee and show up on time, because someone else has done all the legwork and planning for us.

And that is exactly the experience we had last month, at the Escapees Downeast Maine Hangout in Sullivan.

Hangouts are a brand new addition to the Escapees slate of social events for RVers, and since we already counted the program directors as friends, and knew we’d be in the right part of the country, we registered for the Hangout in Maine as soon as we heard about it. Also? I’d never been to Maine!

The week’s schedule was packed full of events. None were mandatory; all were thoroughly researched; and all were described in a printed packet containing detailed instructions on locations, times, and any additional fees.

I think you’ll see pretty quickly how that 8 days in August felt so much like summer camp to us. In roughly chronological order:

1. We went on a group excursion to a historical site.

A visit to Fort Knox was combined with…
one to the adjacent Penobscot Narrows Bridge & Observatory.

2. We went to a lobster bake.

I mangled and ate my first whole lobster!
The folks at Bar Harbor Lobster Bakes were very patient about helping out us newbies, plus there were instructions on our place mats.

3. We went blueberry picking.

The proprietor of Beddington Ridge Farm taught us how to use a rake to collect berries, and although it felt a little like cheating, I used it after picking my first container by hand. Definitely went faster!
I’ve still got 2 pints of these wild blueberries in my freezer. What should I make?

4. We went biking.

Views from the Schoodic Loop Road were breathtaking.
And speaking of breath, I don’t think I’ve ever experienced cleaner, fresher air than we did in Maine. The sea! The pines!
Aaaahhhhhh.

5. We sang camp songs and other hits at karaoke night.

I taught our fellow attendees a song I remembered from my own summer camp days.
It’s about a skunk.
Let us all give thanks that there is no video or audio of this moment.
(Photo credit: D. Goldstein)

6. We went hiking.

Tim and I hiked several miles on our own in Acadia National Park, then joined our group for a ranger guided tour along the Ocean Path.
We obediently flashed the official Hangout sign — the Hawaiian “hang loose,” or shaka — when we saw the camera.
(Photo credit: D. Goldstein)

7. We admired the sunset from atop a mountain.

Our group spread blankets and unfolded chairs at the perfect time to view the setting sun from Cadillac Mountain.

8. We went on a boat tour.

All aboard! Acadia By Sea gave us a different view of places we’d hiked and biked, plus an education on the area’s wildlife and history.
We saw harbor seals, harbor porpoises, bald eagles, osprey, cormorants, and two historic light houses.

9. We got ice cream!

This triple scoop of guilt came from Udder Heaven in Bar Harbor. It was our first stop for ice cream, but not our last! At least all that hiking and biking burned off some of it.

10. We went to a local festival.

Wild blueberry season in Maine means lots of wild blueberry festivals.
Tim and I celebrated this one by running in the annual 5-mile race, which benefited a regional cancer charity. We also treated ourselves to some home grown goodies.

11. We went kayaking.

Our 6-mile guided group tour rewarded us with even more fantastic views, and an upper body workout to balance all the walking, hiking, running and biking we’d done.
Have I mentioned that we had a lot of excess calories to burn?

12. We saw real live lumberjacks in action.

If you ever get the chance to attend Timber Tina’s Great Maine Lumberjack Show, do it.
It’s a bargain, it’s family friendly, it’s entertaining as all get out, and let me just add that lumberjacks sport very pleasing physiques. Very.

13. We stayed in a campground.

Acadia Seashore Camping & Cabins offers RV hookups, tent sites, and even two cabins and two rental RVs.
The owners are friendly and attentive, and the campground boasts views of both bay and mountains.
We’d go back!
Flanders Bay

14. We obeyed the directions of our camp directors.

OK, so David & Cheryl of Landmark Adventures were already friends of ours, and by “obeyed the directions of,” I really mean “posed for selfies and enjoyed all the fun with.”
(Photo credit: D. Goldstein)

15. We shared potluck meals with our fellow campers.

I made a “lobster roll” out of my family famous challah dough. Because Maine.
And it made sense to bring the state’s most famous CRUSTacean to brunch.
(Photo credit: M. McIlraith)

And that wasn’t even all! I didn’t post pictures of the campfires, blueberry recipe contest, craft class, outdoor movie night, star viewing, or all our new friends (44 people in 25 rigs).

We even left with mosquito bites on our legs, just like summer camp when we were kids.

Oh, and you’d better believe we signed up for another Hangout. Next year: Mexico!


Disclaimer: This blog was neither solicited nor compensated by the Escapees RV Club, nor any business mentioned or linked to herein. All opinions are our own; all mistakes are Emily’s (and I’ll correct them if you ask nicely, after I finish smacking my forehead and sighing grumpily).