Yosemite Revisited: More Tips, Less Snark

You may recall that I had less than charitable things to say about our visit to Yosemite last July. The park is spectacular; it’s our timing that was all wrong.

Emily “You Can Embroider That Shit on a Toss Pillow” Rohrer

But with summer travel planning season upon us, I thought it might be a good idea to offer up some information that campers might find a little more helpful than my pissy rant of 2016. So here ya go:

If you’ve got your RV pointed toward California this summer for a swing through Yosemite National Park, be aware of three things:

  1. You’ll never forget the scenery,
  2. Unless you’re a photography genius, you won’t be able to capture all that majesty in pixels, and
  3. It’s gonna be crowded — really, really distressingly and disproportionately crowded, to DisneyWorld-esque levels. 1200 square miles is not big enough for all the people, because every single one of them spent significant time, effort, and money to spend part of their summer vacation there, and they are going to have their Experience of a Lifetime, visiting the same top 5 park attractions as you are.

For information on RV camping at Yosemite, click on Visiting Yosemite With an RV, but be aware that even the folks in charge recommend staying outside the park, and shuttling in using public transportation.

From the NPS web site, “Since parking for RVs and trailers is limited in Yosemite, we strongly encourage you to park your RV outside Yosemite and use YARTS to travel into the park if you’re not staying the night in Yosemite.”

If you do want to try to stay in the park, first make sure your RV will fit, and that you can survive without hookups for the duration of your visit. There aren’t any. However, dump stations with fresh water are available at 3 of the 10 RV-accessible campgrounds, and generator use is allowed, but only at posted hours.

Yosemite campground map
(Source: NPS.gov)

It probably goes without saying that you’ll want to make your reservation as far in advance as possible, or, if you’re feeling lucky and adventurous, you can try for a first-come/first-served spot.

When we visited Yosemite last year, we set up The Toad in a private RV park in Lee Vining, CA, which is about 12 miles east of the westernmost entrance at Tioga Pass, and a nearly 2-hour drive to the main visitor’s center in Yosemite Valley. (Be aware that Tioga Pass/Hwy 120 closes from October-May due to snow, so using Lee Vining as your home base is not always a good option.)

Source: Google Maps

We had to visit in the summer because my husband and our younger son were hiking the John Muir Trail, and that’s something you want to accomplish when there’s little or no snow. And if you’re hiking the whole 211-mile thing, like my husband did, you have to go through Yosemite.

But now that we know what the Yosemite crowds are like in the summertime, we will never do that again. Our schedule is no longer bound by school calendars, and we will use that to our advantage by visiting the more popular national parks at off-peak times in the spring and fall.

How bad was it? Imagine crowds of tourists from all over the planet, hollering to each other in umpteen different languages, trying to enjoy the exact same spot you are, stopping to consult their maps right in your path, posing for selfies in front of everything, dealing with children who have obviously just had it, and/or driving slowly with one arm out the window to shoot video that nobody will ever want to view.

Lower Yosemite Falls, and a very small portion of the day’s tourists

By about 2:00 p.m., I was eyeballing the bear lockers in the parking lot. You’re supposed to put your food items in there, rather than leaving them in your car for bears to tear apart while you’re off exploring. But by mid-afternoon, I was ready to take all the food out, and put half the tourists in.

These are bear lockers. Big enough for tourists, yes?

That said, I found the park to be most enjoyable in the early morning hours. If you can get in and get some sight-seeing and hiking done before what seems to be the Witching Hour of 10:00 a.m., you’ll have a lot more space and breathing room to take in and truly appreciate some of the most eye-popping scenery in the country.

And hey, if you’ve only got one day to spend in the park, try this itinerary from Oh, Ranger!, one of my favorite resources. Be warned: everyone with one day to spend is going to be trying to see the same list of attractions as you are.

There will be crowds.

You will need patience.

Good luck!


Author’s note: Portions of this article appeared previously at OwnLessDoMore, and a version of this post is published at Heartland RVs. It is printed here with permission.

Psssst. We Found a Hidden Camping Gem in KY. Don’t Tell Anyone!

If you’re traveling across Kentucky on I-64, looking for a place to rest for a night or two, check out Lake Shelby Campground, just north of Shelbyville, KY. It might not be for the faint of heart, but it definitely has a lot of heart.

source: Google

The first thing you need to know is that it is small (10 RV spots; tent camping available), and access is along a narrow county park road. We made it in with The Toad, our 38’ 5th wheel plus bike rack on the rear, but it was tight. I would not recommend this park for RVs longer than ours.

The second thing you need to know is that hookups are water and 30-amp electric only, which rules out a lengthy stay for some folks. There is a dump station on the access road into the park.

Third thing? $20/night, cash and checks only. Be prepared with the correct payment method.

Oh, and there’s no wifi. Be prepared for that too. Our AT&T calling and data worked fine.

Plus, the spaces are set really close together, so you’ll get to know your neighbors.

That’s us, second from the right, with the BFT parked directly across the lot.

But…

We stayed there for a week and loved it! Are you now wondering why?

Because we were willing to accept all the things above, which others might consider shortcomings, as perfectly acceptable trade-offs for a spot that backed right up to a lake, with serene views, easy access to a paved urban trail and a 9-hole golf course, and a friendly, down home feel that we very much appreciated.

The RV pads are located along one side of the parking lot at this combined city/county park, so local folks come and go all day to take advantage of the playground, boat launch, nature trails, boat rental, fishing holes, bird watching opportunities, and picnic areas.

However, the park closes at dusk, which means that all the non-campers leave the premises for the night. Even though we were there during Spring Break week and the following weekend, we heard far more noise from the resident flock of geese than we did from any families that had come to enjoy a day of outdoor activities.

There are a couple of communal fire pits and picnic tables for campers to share, and there’s also a bath house that’s a little on the rustic side. We did not make use of the showers ourselves as we prefer our own, but other reviews indicate that they are clean and that hot water is plentiful.

There are also tent sites for those who want to get even closer to nature on their visit to this park, which is not just family friendly but pet friendly too.

You know what this is, right?
It’s an Old Kentucky Home.
~giggle~

I think you’ll see from my photos why we found Lake Shelby Campground so enjoyable. We stayed there for the first week of April 2017, and learned that springtime in central Kentucky is almost too beautiful for words.


Lake Shelby Campground: Just the Facts

  • 35 miles east of Louisville, 25 miles west of Frankfort
  • about 9 miles north of I-64
  • GPS coordinates 38.232395, -85.220067
  • 14333 Burks Branch Road, Shelbyville KY 40065
  • (502) 633-5069
  • water and 30A electric only, dump station on site
  • bathrooms and showers
  • NO wifi or laundry
  • Campground website

Author’s notes:

A version of this post appears at Heartland RVs. It is printed here with permission.

This is an independent review, and we received no compensation from Lake Shelby Campground.

WheRVe we been? Our travels, 1st quarter(-ish) 2017

Here’s a summary of our first quarter travels for 2017, mapped with a little help from Google. RV miles traveled: about 3200.

Source: maps.google.com

Pahrump, NV, Jan. 1-19: We welcomed the new year with our friends, Dan & Lisa of Always On Liberty, met up for some hiking with a pal I hadn’t seen since high school, and then I joined my FriendFest girls in Vegas for our 22nd (almost) annual gathering. No boys allowed, unless they are bringing us drinks with umbrellas in them.

Quartzsite, AZ, Jan. 19-30: More fun with Always On Liberty at the Xscapers convergence, where we successfully and happily survived 12 days of RV living without benefit of hookups, and made our first YouTube appearances in videos produced by Spot the Scotts and RV Love.

Yuma, AZ, Jan. 30 – Feb. 1: A two-night rest on the border, in a casino parking lot. Lots of RV’ers love Yuma. To us? Meh.

Fort Huachuca, AZ, Feb. 1-4: Checked out the wide open spaces of this Army base for a few days en route to San Antonio. Nice little fam camp, great area and cooperative weather for my fitness walks.

Kerrville, TX, Feb. 6-9: We love the peace and quiet of Kerrville-Schreiner Park, and the fact that close friends live there in their RV. They are also handy and helpful: Jay spent many hours working with Tim to install disc brakes on The Toad.

San Antonio, TX, Feb. 9 – March 10: Back to our home base for biannual family visits and medical appointments, plus rodeo and National Margarita Day fun with Always On Liberty (again!). And from there we flew to Mexico for a most relaxing 10-day visit with Tim’s folks in Los Cabos.

Grandview, TX, March 10-25: Not a planned stop, but we were there for two weeks after the BFT’s fuel pump shit the bed on I-35. One entirely new fuel system and a freshly painted RV interior later (because we had that kind of time), we got back on the road to…

Elkhart, IN, March 26 – April 1: Because we were in fact on the way there to have the RV repaired, when the truck died. Irony for the win! Got some welding reinforced on both The Toad and on Mary Jo, our mascot metal chicken. Those guys at Heartland RVs really went the extra mile for us!

Photo credit: Hearland RVs service department

Fort Knox, KY, April 1-2: We needed a place to sit between IN and a scheduled visit in VA, and KY looked good. But there was no cell service and barely useable wifi at the fam camp, so we rolled away after only one night. With both a new truck purchase and our income taxes in the works, we really couldn’t go without connectivity.

You know you’re washing your vehicle on an Army base when…

Shelbyville, KY, April 2-10: Here we sit for a few more days at a humble little municipal park, enjoying the beauty of springtime in the south. Well, except for that day there were hail storms and tornadoes. And except for the past two mornings when we’ve awakened to temps in the 30’s. But hey, the grass is really green!

Coming up next: a week or so in WV before meeting our older son and his girlfriend for a few days of reminiscing in Norfolk, VA, one of our old hometowns. Can’t wait to get my arms around those kids!

From My RV Kitchen: Baked Oatmeal Squares

Got a long driving day ahead? The kind that requires departing before dawn, and not enough time to stop for breakfast?

Here’s a tasty and hearty option that you can bake the day before, for eating on the road. It’s even driver’s seat friendly!

Baked Oatmeal Squares

3 cups quick-cooking or regular oats

1/2 cup packed brown sugar

2 teaspoons baking powder

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

2 eggs

1 cup milk

1/4 cup butter, melted

1/2 cup plain, nonfat traditional or Greek yogurt

1 teaspoon vanilla

Optional: add 1 cup of mix-ins such as chopped dried fruit, nuts, and/or flavored baking morsels

Preheat oven to 350°.

In a large bowl, combine oats, brown sugar, baking powder, salt and cinnamon.

In another bowl, whisk eggs, milk, butter, vanilla, and yogurt.

Stir into oat mixture until blended. Add mix-ins if using, and stir to blend.

Spoon into a greased 9-in. square baking pan.

Bake 40-45 minutes or until set, and allow to cool completely. Although there is no flour in the recipe, the bars bake to a moist, thick, cake-like consistency.

Cut into 9 squares, then zip into sandwich bags or wrap in plastic for individual servings.

My version is adapted from this original recipe.

Emily’s notes:

My most recent mix-in combo was chopped walnuts, dried cranberries, and chocolate chips. Delicious!

I get perfect results by baking these in my RV’s Half-time Convection Oven at 350 degrees for 22 minutes.

For a filling and fuss-free “Front Seat Breakfast” for driver and passenger/s, serve the bars with hard boiled eggs and bananas.

No need to save them for travel days. If you’re sitting in a non-moving location, you can try serving these squares as originally intended: in a bowl, with milk poured over top. Eat like oatmeal!

(Author’s note:  a version of this post appears at Heartland RVs. It is printed here with permission.)

RV Travels: Where the Wild Things Are

~ a post in honor of World Wildlife Day, March 3 ~

Although we’ve encountered lots of creatures while RV’ing around the country in The Toad, the only Bighorn we’ve seen in the wild is the one we live in. Notoriously shy, those sheep!

Look! A Bighorn in the wild!

Most animals were outside the RV, living unperturbed in the environments where they belong — at least until I showed up and became the Annoying Human Taking A Selfie.

There was one notable exception. I don’t like talking about it, and I’m not sure it even qualifies as wildlife, but it definitely wasn’t a domesticated critter, and it was living inside our RV. I’ve got to work myself up to that one, so I’m saving it for last.

The others, in alphabetical order:

Armadillo – I’ve spent enough time driving in the Lone Star State to know exactly why these armored gray diggers are called Texas Speed Bumps. Yeah. Ewwwww. But I found a live one in Shreveport, LA, during an overnight stay at the Barksdale Air Force Base RV Park, so of course I positioned myself for a discreet selfie. The armadillo did not say no.

April 2016

Bison – This guy was blocking our path to Frary Peak, the highest point on Antelope Island, in Utah’s Great Salt Lake. “Bison encounter” was one of those bucket list items I didn’t even know I had until I experienced it, and I wrote about it here. We’d been warned by multiple signs not to approach or feed the bison, but the signs didn’t say anything about begging them repeatedly to get out of the way, so that’s what we did. I think the poor bugger eventually got tired of listening to us, and trotted down the hill toward the females.

July 2016

July 2016

Burros – Wild burros are a common sight in rural western Nevada, and this group took their own sweet time crossing the road to the Rhyolite Ghost Town near Beatty.

January 2017

Cat & Deer – Yes, together, and I wouldn’t have believed it if I hadn’t seen it myself. There’s a posse of feral cats at Kerrville-Schreiner Park in Texas, and we watched them interact with the deer on several occasions. Most of the time, each regarded the other in some bizarre form of woodland creature détente, but we once witnessed one of the kitties deliberately baiting one of the deer by sneaking up behind it and pouncing. The deer was not amused.

February 2017

Elk – There we were, walking along a paved path on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon, when I was able to take advantage of a unique opportunity: sELKfie for the win!

October 2016

Fox – We were driving to a trailhead in Nevada’s Red Rock Canyon with fellow Heartland Owners, Dan & Lisa of Always on Liberty, when we saw this fox trotting across a parking lot. What does the fox say? I can’t tell you. What I said was, “A fox a fox a fox!” It’s very difficult to remain eloquent when faced with such a rarity.

December 2016

Llama – On one of our first trips in The Toad, we went to Blanco State Park in Texas for a weekend escape. I was supposed to be guiding Tim as he backed the rig into our spot, but it took more than one try because — and I am not making this up — I was distracted by a llama. It kept grinning at me, I swear. See?

November 2014

Whale – While visiting family in western Washington, we drove our whale of a rig onto the Port Townsend – Coupeville Ferry to get from one side of Puget Sound to the other, and were rewarded with a visit from a pod of orcas, right off the bow. So majestic!

December 2015

Wild Ponies – The highest point in Virginia is Mount Rogers. To get to it, we hiked through Grayson Highlands State Park, which is home to a herd of wild ponies. I tried for a selfie with one of them too (it’s what I do) — and became a victim of what can best be described as “pony shenanigans.” While I posed with Pony A, Pony B took advantage of my distraction and tried to eat my backpack. Emily = stupid human.

October 2015

 

And now…

The Thing That Ate My Pastry Brush – We had a critter in the RV last fall.

Based on the droppings we found, we were pretty sure that cockroaches were afoot (although it could have been a mouse), but whatever it was, it nibbled. the bristles. off. my silicone. pastry brush. Ack!

Nothing like spending an evening researching various types of vermin poop to make a girl feel sexy. I seriously though I was going to throw up, and contemplated bathing in boiling Purell, but instead set about cleaning and disinfecting every reachable surface in our kitchen.

And then I set out dishes of a vermin-eradicating cocktail composed of equal parts powdered sugar and Borax. Success! Emily = smart human.

October 2016
See the middle finger? Unintentional, but oh so hilarious!

To learn more about the real World Wildlife Day, visit http://wildlifeday.org

(Author’s note:  a version of this post appears at Heartland RVs. It is printed here with permission.)