From My RV Kitchen: Chickpeas in Curried Coconut Broth

Here’s an easy vegetarian dish bursting with exotic flavors, but without a long list of difficult-to-find ingredients.

Back in the day when my mom was the one doing the family’s cooking, it may have taken some persistent shopping to find things like curry powder, coconut milk, basmati rice, and fresh cilantro, but now it’s common to see more than one brand or variety of each on the shelves of even small-town grocery stores.

The best part is that this meal is prepared in a slow cooker, so it can simmer while you’re out exploring your latest camping destination.

I like to serve this dish with a garden salad and fresh fruit slices on the side.

Chickpeas in Curried Coconut Broth

2 teaspoons canola oil

1 medium onion, chopped

3-4 stalks celery, sliced

2 garlic cloves, minced

2 (19-ounce) cans chickpeas (garbanzo beans), rinsed and drained

2 (14.5-ounce) cans diced tomatoes, undrained

1 (13.5-ounce) can coconut milk

1 tablespoon curry powder

2 tablespoons chopped pickled jalapeño pepper

1 teaspoon salt

6 cups hot cooked basmati rice

1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro

Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add onion, celery, and garlic; sauté 5 minutes or until onion is tender.

Place onion mixture, chickpeas, and next 5 ingredients (through salt) in a 3 1/2-quart electric slow cooker; stir well. Cover and cook on LOW for 6 to 8 hours.

Serve over rice, and sprinkle each serving with cilantro.

My recipe is adapted from this original.


Author’s note: A version of this post appears at Heartland RVs. It is printed here with permission.

Yosemite Revisited: More Tips, Less Snark

You may recall that I had less than charitable things to say about our visit to Yosemite last July. The park is spectacular; it’s our timing that was all wrong.

Emily “You Can Embroider That Shit on a Toss Pillow” Rohrer

But with summer travel planning season upon us, I thought it might be a good idea to offer up some information that campers might find a little more helpful than my pissy rant of 2016. So here ya go:

If you’ve got your RV pointed toward California this summer for a swing through Yosemite National Park, be aware of three things:

  1. You’ll never forget the scenery,
  2. Unless you’re a photography genius, you won’t be able to capture all that majesty in pixels, and
  3. It’s gonna be crowded — really, really distressingly and disproportionately crowded, to DisneyWorld-esque levels. 1200 square miles is not big enough for all the people, because every single one of them spent significant time, effort, and money to spend part of their summer vacation there, and they are going to have their Experience of a Lifetime, visiting the same top 5 park attractions as you are.

For information on RV camping at Yosemite, click on Visiting Yosemite With an RV, but be aware that even the folks in charge recommend staying outside the park, and shuttling in using public transportation.

From the NPS web site, “Since parking for RVs and trailers is limited in Yosemite, we strongly encourage you to park your RV outside Yosemite and use YARTS to travel into the park if you’re not staying the night in Yosemite.”

If you do want to try to stay in the park, first make sure your RV will fit, and that you can survive without hookups for the duration of your visit. There aren’t any. However, dump stations with fresh water are available at 3 of the 10 RV-accessible campgrounds, and generator use is allowed, but only at posted hours.

Yosemite campground map
(Source: NPS.gov)

It probably goes without saying that you’ll want to make your reservation as far in advance as possible, or, if you’re feeling lucky and adventurous, you can try for a first-come/first-served spot.

When we visited Yosemite last year, we set up The Toad in a private RV park in Lee Vining, CA, which is about 12 miles east of the westernmost entrance at Tioga Pass, and a nearly 2-hour drive to the main visitor’s center in Yosemite Valley. (Be aware that Tioga Pass/Hwy 120 closes from October-May due to snow, so using Lee Vining as your home base is not always a good option.)

Source: Google Maps

We had to visit in the summer because my husband and our younger son were hiking the John Muir Trail, and that’s something you want to accomplish when there’s little or no snow. And if you’re hiking the whole 211-mile thing, like my husband did, you have to go through Yosemite.

But now that we know what the Yosemite crowds are like in the summertime, we will never do that again. Our schedule is no longer bound by school calendars, and we will use that to our advantage by visiting the more popular national parks at off-peak times in the spring and fall.

How bad was it? Imagine crowds of tourists from all over the planet, hollering to each other in umpteen different languages, trying to enjoy the exact same spot you are, stopping to consult their maps right in your path, posing for selfies in front of everything, dealing with children who have obviously just had it, and/or driving slowly with one arm out the window to shoot video that nobody will ever want to view.

Lower Yosemite Falls, and a very small portion of the day’s tourists

By about 2:00 p.m., I was eyeballing the bear lockers in the parking lot. You’re supposed to put your food items in there, rather than leaving them in your car for bears to tear apart while you’re off exploring. But by mid-afternoon, I was ready to take all the food out, and put half the tourists in.

These are bear lockers. Big enough for tourists, yes?

That said, I found the park to be most enjoyable in the early morning hours. If you can get in and get some sight-seeing and hiking done before what seems to be the Witching Hour of 10:00 a.m., you’ll have a lot more space and breathing room to take in and truly appreciate some of the most eye-popping scenery in the country.

And hey, if you’ve only got one day to spend in the park, try this itinerary from Oh, Ranger!, one of my favorite resources. Be warned: everyone with one day to spend is going to be trying to see the same list of attractions as you are.

There will be crowds.

You will need patience.

Good luck!


Author’s note: Portions of this article appeared previously at OwnLessDoMore, and a version of this post is published at Heartland RVs. It is printed here with permission.

Little Beaver, Big Treat: Our Stay at a State Park in Wild Wonderful WV

I grew up in western Maryland, not far from the West Virginia border, and through my teenage sarcasm filter, I interpreted WV’s slogan “Almost Heaven” to really mean “almost nothing.”

I was wrong.

But I was also kind of right.

This is private property near the state park.
It is not a golf course. Or Heaven. Despite appearances to the contrary.

There isn’t a lot by way of big cities in West Virginia, and to a mall-obsessed teenager of the 1980’s, that put the state in a location way further south than Heaven, if you know what I mean.

But through my adult eyes, I can see that it’s because of all that “nothing” that the state feels like a paradise on earth.

Those rural pastures, secluded lakes, winding roads and rolling mountains that I scoffed at as a teen because they were “so middle of nowhere, Mom <eyeroll>” now seem heavenly indeed.

Earlier this year, we looked at the map for our upcoming journey eastward along I-64 from Kentucky (see my review of the Lake Shelby Campground) toward our ultimate destination of Norfolk, VA.

Knowing that we had a few extra days to spend en route, we chose the approximate halfway point of Beckley, WV, as our stopping place. And since we are big fans of state parks, nearby Little Beaver became our home of choice for that week.

Source: Google Maps

We knew from reading independent reviews that the 2-mile drive from the interstate into the campground was narrow, hilly, and curvy — not a favorite for those who drive or tow recreational vehicles!

Our 38’ 5th wheel plus 1-ton dually are almost 60′ long, and I was able to negotiate the road with no issues, just verrrrrry slowly and cautiously. I only made Tim suck in his breath and say “Watch the rear wheels!” one time, so I consider that a success.

And once we were in the park? Oh, the beauty and serenity! During the area’s spring break week in April, the place was surprisingly uncrowded, at least by humans. Which means we were treated to multiple wildlife sightings during our visit, as well as plenty of peace and quiet.

Our campsite: shaded and secluded, just like we like it

The view from the OwnLessDoMore work station did not suck. It’s a wonder I got anything done, really.

Little Beaver Lake

Things to do in the park include fishing, boating, hiking, biking, geocaching, and bird and wildlife watching, and there are also picnic areas, playgrounds, and tent/group camping areas.


Little Beaver State Park: Just the Facts

  • 71 miles southeast of Charleston WV, 180 miles west of Charlottesville VA
  • about 2 miles south of I-64, near Beckley WV
  • GPS coordinates 37.755833, -81.080556
  • 1402 Grandview Road, Beaver WV 25813
  • email: littlebeaversp@wv.gov
  • (304) 763-2494
  • http://littlebeaverstatepark.com
  • 40-foot RV length limit
  • water and 30/50A; some sites are water only; no sewer hook-ups
  • dump station on site
  • bathrooms, showers, laundry
  • limited wifi (accessible at camp store, but not at RV sites; our AT&T cellular data worked well)
  • combination of reservable and first-come/first-served sites
  • no fee to enter park
  • rates for RV sites: $30 for W/E, and $28 for W only. Discounts for senior citizens and veterans.
  • SEASONAL: Campground closes October 31 and reopens on April 1

And hey, while you’re there, you’ll probably drive the 9 miles into Beckley for grocery and supply runs. Don’t miss a meal at the King Tut Drive-In for a true trip down small-town America’s memory lane. Save room for homemade pie and hand spun milk shakes! (Note: closed Wednesdays)

I am a big fan of liver & onions.
There are plenty of other goodies on the menu.
You do you.


Author’s notes:

A version of this post appears at Heartland RVs. It is printed here with permission.

This is an independent review. We received no compensation from Little Beaver State Park or the King Tut Drive-In.

Best Money I Ever Spent: RV Accessories That Were Worth Every Penny

Are you ready to make a shopping list?

About a month ago, I asked a few Heartland RV owners to help me warn others about regrettable RV accessory purchases: items they bought that just didn’t work out.

This month?

This month, it’s time to flip the coin and report from the opposite side.

Items are listed in alphabetical order, and the cost approximated to account for differences in retailer pricing, tax, shipping, and special offers.

Links to manufacturer/retailer pages were provided by contributors as a starting point for your research. You may find better pricing and selection elsewhere.

BodySpa RV Shower Kit by Oxygenics

$45.00

“Uses less water and the pressure is great. My family loves showering in our RV now.”

Stacy Vaughn, owner of a 2017 Road Warrior 427

Photo source: Camping World


30-Pint Electronic Dehumidifier by Haier

$160.00

“Where we live is hot and humid, and we will soon be moving to the wet Pacific Northwest. We found that we were sticking to our furniture and bedsheets, and the bathroom just never seemed to completely dry out after showers. This dehumidifier has curbed those issues, and as a bonus has helped with the efficiency of our the A/C units.”

Carissa Edwards, owner of a 2014 Big Country

Photo source: Target


Elongated Ceramic Toilet, Model 320, by Dometic

$200.00

“Our new toilet eliminated some unpleasant issues. It’s taller so it’s more comfortable to sit on; the bowl is deeper so there’s plenty of space between us and the water; the seat and lid are both sturdy wood rather than plastic; the seat is elongated instead of round, making…um…personal hygiene tasks easier; when flushed, it rinses all the way around the bowl from under the rim; and it has a hand sprayer to quickly dispatch any stubborn residue. In short, it’s much more like a residential toilet, which is exactly what we want in our full-time home. It was easy to install, too. Who knew a lowly toilet could make us so happy?”

David Goldstein, owner of a 2013 Landmark San Antonio

Here’s a video of the product installation on David’s blog, Landmark Adventures.

(Author’s note: We at OwnLessDoMore also upgraded to this toilet, and our behinds stand behind David’s assessment.)

Photo source: Amazon


GlowStep Revolution Step System by Torklift

$600.00

“What makes them worth every penny is that they easily adjust to a variety of terrain, and have adjustable stabilizing legs which make contact with the ground, eliminating bounce. The step size between each step adjusts equally, so there is no gigantic step at the top or bottom of the rise. No need for a portable extra step, ever again! For me and my poor knees, these steps are a true lifesaver. I no longer have knee stress with step sizes that are uncomfortable. These steps will go with me if we ever change coaches.”

Erika Dorsey, owner of a 2016 Heartland Big Country 4010RD

Here’s a full write-up of the product installation on Erika’s blog, Mammoth Travels.

Photo source: Erika Dorsey

Feel free to comment below with your own tale of money well spent!


Author’s note: A version of this post appears at Heartland RVs. It is printed here with permission.

“Oh goody. Another project!” I said. RV done yet?

The Toad was built in 2008, and RV insulation standards have come a long way since our little home on wheels came off the assembly line.

To put it briefly, our fifth wheel’s threshold for extreme temperatures is a lot lower than that of newer units made for year-round enjoyment. We do our best to control our climate by supplementing our furnace and AC with space heaters and fans as needed, which is often.

The most obvious area for improvement: the basement ceiling. There’s nothing between those aluminum joists but air — air that does nothing to help us control the temperature in the bedroom, which sits right above that storage area.

There it is, the nothing between the joists.

The joists are not spaced at typical household intervals (ours weren’t even spaced at consistent intervals) so we had to do a lot of trimming to make standard pink insulation fit between them.

This time, I remembered to get proof that I was on the job too.
Please note that my footwear coordinates with the fiberglass insulation.

Materials

  • Single-faced fiberglass R-13 insulation
  • 2” HVAC tape
  • Tape measure
  • Utility knife

There’s not a lot to say about the “how to” part of the installation. Our day went kind of like this:

  • Pull everything out of basement
  • Measure
  • Measure again
  • Cut
  • Contort
  • Shove
  • Tape
  • Uncontort
  • Put everything back in basement
  • Look forward to enjoying a warmer bedroom this winter*

Measure

Cut

Contort

Tape

Oh, and don’t forget a lunch break.
We went out for Thai!

*Even after complaining loudly and often about spending a whole day in May on the project, inhaling pink insulation fibers and wondering why your husband can’t just wear pajamas when he’s cold.


Author’s note: A version of this post appears at Heartland RVs. It is printed here with permission.